J307938

Diamond Black Initial Pendant, Sterling, 1/4ct,by Affinity

$99.00

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Description
Step up your personal style with this diamond initial pendant. Boldly crafted with bead-set black diamonds, the script initial is a fabulous way to show off your personal pride--or treat someone with a heartfelt, personalized gift. From Affinity(R) Diamond Jewelry.

A thru Z.

  • Includes pendant and box link chain
  • Sterling silver
  • Total diamond weight is approximately 1/4 carat; diamond weights are minimum weights
  • Script initial with bead-set black diamonds
  • Black diamonds: natural diamonds, color treated
  • Chain secures with a spring ring clasp
  • Approximate measurements: Pendant sizes vary from 1/2"L x 1/4"W to 7/8"W; Chain 18"L x 1/16"W
  • Pendant made in India; Chain made in Italy

See a list of products from Affinity(R) Diamond Jewelry show that aired

Wednesday, May 25, 2016 from 1 – 3 a.m. ET

Important Details

The GIA (Gemological Institute of America) is widely recognized as the world's foremost authority in gemology, including diamonds, colored stones, and pearls. Through research, education, and laboratory services, the GIA serves the public interest through objective gemstone evaluation, including identification.

You can purchase our gemstone jewelry with added confidence knowing that QVC incorporates the GIA's expertise into the QVC gemstone identification quality assurance process.

For more information on the GIA, visit www.GIA.edu.

For more information on the gemstones found at QVC, check out our gemstone glossary.

About Affinity Jewelry

About Affinity
You know and trust the quality of QVC's diamond jewelry. You've heard how stringent our Quality Assurance process is. We're proud to call our diamond jewelry: AffinityTM. Affinity, because that's what you'll feel for your diamond jewelry every time you wear it. This exquisite combination of Beauty, Value and Quality offers the wearer fine natural diamonds in fashionable settings at affordable prices, backed by the demanding process that we call "10 Steps to Quality Assurance." Experience the affordable luxury of Affinity diamond jewelry created specially for QVC.

QVC business ethics guidelines strictly prohibit purchasing or selling gemstone products that originate from a group or country that engages in or supports illegal, inhumane, or terrorist activities. QVC expects all vendors to comply with all applicable state and federal laws and regulations including the USA Patriot Act and the Kimberley Process.

Affinity Buyers Guide
About Diamond
Diamond

Stone Information

Diamond's characteristic chemical composition and crystal structure make it a unique member of the mineral kingdom.

Diamond is the only gem made of a single element: It is typically about 99.95 percent carbon. The other 0.05 percent can include one or more trace elements, which are atoms that aren't part of the diamond's essential chemistry. Some trace elements can influence its color or crystal shape.

The way a mineral forms helps determine its identity. Diamond forms under high temperature and pressure conditions that exist only within a specific depth range (about 100 miles) beneath the earth's surface. Diamond's crystal structure is isometric, which means the carbon atoms are bonded in essentially the same way in all directions. Another mineral, graphite, also contains only carbon, but its formation process and crystal structure are very different. The result is that graphite is so soft that you can write with it, while diamond is so hard that you can only scratch it with another diamond.

A diamond has to go through a lot before it reaches the jeweler's display case. It forms deep in the earth under extreme heat and pressure. It's ejected violently upward until it arrives at or near the earth's surface. It's forced from its hiding place by nature or by man. Then it's cleaved and cut and polished until its natural beauty shines through.

Without any one of these factors, diamond might be just another mineral. Fortunately, though, this special combination of chemical composition, crystal structure, and formation process gives diamonds the qualities that make them extraordinary.

On almost all modern birthstone lists, diamond is recognized today as the birthstone for April. Diamond is also the gem that marks the 60th and 75th wedding anniversaries.

Legend & Lore

Diamonds have a long history as beautiful objects of desire. In the first century AD, the Roman naturalist Pliny stated: "Diamond is the most valuable, not only of precious stones, but of all things in this world."
The world's love of diamonds had its start in India, where diamonds were gathered from the country's rivers and streams. Some historians estimate that India was trading in diamonds as early as the fourth century BC. The country's resources yielded limited quantities for an equally limited market: India's very wealthy classes. Gradually, though, this changed. Indian diamonds found their way, along with other exotic merchandise, to Western Europe in the caravans that traveled to Venice's medieval markets. By the 1400s, diamonds were becoming fashionable accessories for Europe's elite.

In the early 1700s, as India's diamond supplies began to decline, Brazil emerged as an important source. Diamonds were discovered in the pans of gold miners as they sifted through the gravels of local rivers. Once it reached its full potential, Brazil dominated the diamond market for more than 150 years.

The 1800s brought increasing affluence to western Europe and the United States. Explorers unearthed the first great South African diamond deposits in the late 1800s just as diamond demand broadened. The story of the modern diamond market really begins on the African continent, with the 1866 discovery of diamonds in Kimberley, South Africa. The South African sources affected many segments of the diamond industry. This was especially true as diamond mining moved from the surface to farther underground. Because of the huge costs and comparatively low yields involved, the new sources forced the development of more efficient mining techniques. They created the need for better marketing. They also led to advances in cutting and polishing—advances that increased efficiency, reduced costs, and enhanced the appearance of finished stones.

In the 1870s, annual production of rough diamond was well under a million carats. By the 1920s, the figure was around three million carats. Fifty years later, annual production approached 50 million carats, and in the 1990s it surpassed 100 million carats per year.

Quality Factors

One of the first things most people learn about diamonds is that not all diamonds are created equal. In fact, every diamond is unique. Diamonds come in many sizes, shapes, colors, and with various internal characteristics.

Jewelry professionals use a systematic way to evaluate and discuss these factors. Otherwise, there would be no way to compare one diamond to another. And there would be no way to evaluate and discuss the qualities of an individual diamond. Diamond professionals use the grading system developed by GIA in the 1950s, which established the use of four important factors to describe and classify diamonds: Clarity, Color, Cut, and Carat Weight.

These are known as the Four Cs. When used together, they describe the quality of a finished diamond. The value of a finished diamond is based on this combination.

Color
Diamonds come in many colors. Diamonds that range from colorless to light yellow and brown fall within the normal color range. Within that range, colorless diamonds are the most rare, so they're the most valuable. They set the standard for grading and pricing other diamonds in the normal color range.

The GIA D-to-Z scale is the industry standard for color-grading diamonds. Each letter represents a range of color based on a diamond's tone and saturation.

Diamond

Clarity
Diamonds have internal features, called inclusions, and surface irregularities, called blemishes. Together, they're called clarity characteristics. Clarity is the relative absence of inclusions and blemishes.

Like the rest of the Four Cs, clarity's influence on value is directly related to the concept of rarity. Flawless is the top grade in the GIA Clarity Grading System. Diamonds graded Flawless don't have visible inclusions or blemishes when examined under 10-power (10X) magnification by a skilled and experienced grader. Flawless diamonds are very rare. They're so rare, in fact, that it's possible to spend a lifetime in the jewelry industry without ever seeing one, and they command top prices.

At the other end of the scale are diamonds with inclusions that can be easily seen by the unaided eye. Between the two extremes are diamonds with inclusions visible only under 10X magnification. Diamonds in the middle range make up the bulk of the retail market.

There are 11 clarity grades in the GIA clarity grading system. They are Flawless, Internally Flawless, two categories of Very, Very Slightly Included, two categories of Slightly Included, and three categories of Included.

The effect of a clarity characteristic on the clarity grade is based on its size, number, position, nature, and color or relief.

Cut
A beautiful diamond looks the way it does because of three optical effects: white light reflections called brightness; flashes of color called fire; and areas of light and dark called scintillation. Pattern is the relative size, arrangement, and contrast of bright and dark areas that result from a diamond's internal and external reflections. There must be enough contrast between the bright and dark areas to give the pattern a crisp, sharp look.

The term "cut" also can describe a fashioned diamond's shape. Shapes other than the standard round brilliant are called fancy cuts. They're sometimes called fancy shapes or fancies. Fancy shapes also have names of their own, based on their shapes. Some of the best known are the marquise, princess, pear, oval, heart, and emerald cut.

Carat Weight
Diamond weights are stated in metric carats, abbreviated "ct." One metric carat is two-tenths (0.2) of a gram—just over seven thousandths (0.007) of an ounce. One ounce contains almost 142 carats. A small paper clip weighs about a carat.

The metric carat is divided into 100 points. A point is one hundredth of a carat.

Diamonds are weighed to a thousandth (0.001) of a carat and then rounded to the nearest hundredth, or point. Fractions of a carat can mean price differences of hundreds—even thousands—of dollars, depending on diamond quality.

Over a carat, diamond weights are usually expressed in carats and decimals. A 1.03-carat stone, for example, would be described as "one point oh three carats," or "one oh three." Weights for diamonds that weigh under a carat are usually stated in points. A diamond that weighs 0.83 carat is said to weigh "eighty-three points," or called an "eighty-three pointer."

Colors

Diamonds in the normal color range are colorless through light yellow and are described using the industry's D-to-Z color-grading scale. Fancy color diamonds, on the other hand, are yellow and brown diamonds that exhibit color beyond the Z range, or diamonds that exhibit any other color face-up. These rare specimens come in every color of the spectrum, including, most importantly, blue, green, pink, and red.

Diamond

Cleaning

Diamonds can be cleaned safely with lint-free cloths, commercial jewelry cleaning solutions, and household detergents.

Harsher cleaning methods are not recommended for home use. These include powdered abrasive household cleansers, ultrasonic cleaners, and steam cleaners.

This information was excerpted from GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about GIA, click here.

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Reviews & Community QA

Rated 2.7 out of 5 by 9 reviewers.
Rated 5 out of 5 by Sweet everyday piece I bought this for sentimental reasons. I bought the "J" and the script is beautiful. It reminds me of my grandmothers handwriting. The size is perfect for everyday wear and black diamonds are reflective, subtle and the chain is nice. With the price of precious metals now, gold is out of my pay rate. It is as I expected. 12-05-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by I love it! I have a lot of expensive jewelry, but for a fun piece that looks great with jeans -- or in the neck of a nice dress - this is perfect! WORTH EVERY PENNY! 04-29-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by Petite I love the script style of the initial. I agree with other ladies about the chain being tangled. I had to use the tip of a safety pin to get it untangled. I also thought the bail was large enough to fit over a larger, more substantial chain. If you can find a chain with a different closure, than it would possibly fit. I plan on keeping it because I like black stones. I plan to wear it with black spinel jewelry. 04-25-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by Just Right For ME I read all the reviews and already ordered, and worried, this would be my first order from Affinity Diamonds. Yes it is high in price but the diamonds have to be placed in these designs ect. I love mine I have been looking for L forever . I can wear this L with other necklaces without getting in the way. (iam not taking it off) Iam very very happy with the size and workmanship. This is my first review on the QVC. thankyou for all you do to make us proud of our jewlery. 04-20-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by I Like It! I like this necklace. It is dainty, but I don't think this initial pendant would be very attractive, if it was any bigger. But, it is rather expensive for what you got. Mine also arrived with the chain all tangled. It took some work to get it untangled. Wasn't happy about that, but the black diamonds really sparkle. I'm keeping mine. 04-11-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by Needs Work I so agree with the other reviews. I received this necklace three days ago and am still trying to get the small chain untangled. Hopefully by August, my sister's birthday which I bought this for, I will have it untangled. The initial is ok. I thought that it would be more substantial. On second thought, I will probably just send the whole thing back. So disappointed, especially since other pieces of jewelry I have gotten from Affinity have been so nice. 04-09-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by Not Happy !! Was so looking forward to receiving this, so unhappy when I opened the box. It is tiny. I expected it to be a little bigger. Way overpriced. The chain is so tangled it will take some time to get it straightened out and I am not going to mess with it,. It is going back.. Sorry QVC I expected better !! 04-08-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by Too Small and too expensive.. I have to agree with the other reviewer here... I ordered this thinking it would be substantial at the very least. However this pendant is extremely thin and so tiny in size. I was very disappointed when I got it in the mail. It is going back.. I refuse to pay this price for what I received. 04-06-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by Cheap Worst piece of affinity I have ever received. I have a lot of affinity pieces and have never had to send one back but this is definitely going back so cheap looking. Sheila 04-05-13
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