J310334

Sterling 5-Stone Round Birthstone Band Ring

$62.50

Please select a color:

 

Please select a size:

 
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
Description
Birth sign. Point out your special month of the year with this sterling silver ring on your finger. Featuring five round, prong-set gemstones adorning the band, it makes your birthday last all year long.

January/Garnet, February/Amethyst, March/Aquamarine, April/White Topaz, May/Emerald, June/Cultured Freshwater Pearl, July/Ruby, August/Peridot, September/Sapphire, October/Opal, November/Citrine, December/Blue Topaz.

For more details on this ring's fit, please refer to the Ring Size Guide above.

  • Sterling silver
  • Total gemstone weights are approximate: Amethyst 0.95 carat; Aquamarine 0.95 carat; Blue Topaz 1.20 carats; Citrine 0.95 carat; Emerald 1.00 carat; Garnet 1.30 carats; Peridot 1.05 carats; Ruby 1.25 carats; Sapphire 1.25 carats; White Topaz 1.20 carats
  • Cultured freshwater pearls measure approximately 4mm
  • Five round, prong-set gemstones
  • Standard fit; sizes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
  • Measures approximately 1/8"L x 3/4"W
  • Made in China

Important Details

The GIA (Gemological Institute of America) is widely recognized as the world's foremost authority in gemology, including diamonds, colored stones, and pearls. Through research, education, and laboratory services, the GIA serves the public interest through objective gemstone evaluation, including identification.

You can purchase our gemstone jewelry with added confidence knowing that QVC incorporates the GIA's expertise into the QVC gemstone identification quality assurance process.

For more information on the GIA, visit www.GIA.edu.

For more information on the gemstones found at QVC, check out our gemstone glossary.

About Emerald
Emerald

Stone Information

Emerald is the most famous member of the beryl family. There are other green gems, like tourmaline and peridot, but emerald is the one that's always associated with the lushest landscapes and the richest greens. Ireland is the Emerald Isle. Seattle, in the US state of Washington, is the Emerald City. Thailand's most sacred religious icon is called the Emerald Buddha, even though it's carved from green jadeite. The first known emerald mines were in Egypt, dating from at least 330 BC into the 1700s. Cleopatra was known to have a passion for emerald, and used it in her royal adornments. As the gem of spring, emerald is the perfect choice as the birthstone for the month of May. It's also the gem of the twentieth and thirty-fifth wedding anniversaries.

Legend & Lore

Legends endowed the wearer with the ability to foresee the future when emerald was placed under the tongue, as well as to reveal truth and be protected against evil spells. Emerald was once also believed to cure diseases like cholera and malaria. Wearing an emerald was believed to reveal the truth or falseness of a lover's oath as well as make one an eloquent speaker.

Color

Emerald is the green to greenish blue variety of beryl, a mineral species that also includes aquamarine as well as beryls in other colors. Gem experts differ on the degree of green that makes one stone an emerald and another stone a less-expensive green beryl. Some people in the trade tend to give the name emerald to any green beryl colored by chromium. But to most gemologists, gemological laboratories, and colored stone dealers, it is more correct to call a stone green beryl when its color is "too light" for it to be classified as emerald.

Emerald

Cleaning

Some estimates state that 90 percent or more of emeralds are fracture-filled. Since the great majority of fashioned natural emeralds contain filled fractures, it's risky to clean them ultrasonically or with steam. Ultrasonic vibrations can weaken already-fractured stones, and hot steam can cause oil or unhardened resin to sweat out of fractures. Using warm, soapy water coupled with gentle scrubbing is the safest way to clean emeralds.

This information was excerpted from GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about GIA, click here.

Shop our selection of emerald jewelry.

About Ruby
Ruby

Stone Information & Mining

Ruby is the most valuable variety of the corundum mineral species, which also includes sapphire. Rubies can command the highest per-carat price of any colored stone. This makes ruby one of the most important gems in the colored stone market. In its purest form, the mineral corundum is colorless. Trace elements that become part of the mineral's crystal structure cause variations in its color. Chromium is the trace element that causes ruby's red, which ranges from an orangy red to a purplish red. The name ruby comes from the Latin word ruber, which means "red." The glowing red of ruby suggested an inextinguishable flame burning in the stone, even shining through clothing and able to boil water. The most renowned rubies, like those from Myanmar, the Himalayas, and northern Vietnam, typically form in marble. They're found in layers that are distributed irregularly within the surrounding marble. In other locations, rubies can be found in basalt rocks. Rubies from these sources can have higher iron content, which can make the rubies darker and less intense in color.

Legend & Lore

Ruby is one of the most historically significant colored stones. Rubies are mentioned four times in the Bible, in association with attributes like beauty and wisdom. In the ancient language of Sanskrit, ruby is called ratnaraj, or "king of precious stones." Ruby retained its importance with the birth of the western world and became one of the most sought-after gems of European royalty and the upper classes. Many medieval Europeans wore rubies to guarantee health, wealth, wisdom, and success in love. Desire for ruby is just as great today as it always has been. As a symbol of passion, ruby makes an ideal romantic gift. Consumers are drawn to the lush color because it also signifies wealth and success.

Color

Color is the most significant factor affecting a ruby's value. The finest ruby has a pure, vibrant red to slightly purplish red color. As the color becomes too orangy or more purplish, the ruby moves down the quality scale. The highest-quality rubies have vivid color saturation.

Ruby

Cleaning

Warm soapy water is always safe. Ultrasonic and steam cleaners are usually safe for untreated, heat-treated, and lattice diffusion treated stones. Fracture-filled, cavity-filled, or dyed material should only be cleaned with a damp cloth.

This information was excerpted from GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about GIA, click here.

Shop our selection of ruby jewelry.

About Topaz
Topaz

Stone Information

Many consumers know topaz as simply an inexpensive blue gem. They're surprised to learn that its blue color is hardly ever natural: It's almost always caused by treatment. They might also be surprised to know that topaz has so many more colors to offer gem lovers, including pinks and purples that rival the finest fancy sapphires. The color varieties are often identified simply by hue name—blue topaz, pink topaz, and so forth—but there are also a couple of special trade names. Imperial topaz is a medium reddish orange to orange-red. This is one of the gem's most expensive colors. Sherry topaz—named after the sherry wine—is a yellowish brown or brownish yellow to orange. Stones in this color range are often called precious topaz to help distinguish them from the similarly colored but less expensive citrine and smoky quartz.

Legend & Lore

Most authorities agree that the name topaz comes from Topazios, the old Greek name for a small island in the Red Sea, now called Zabargad. (The island never produced topaz, but it was once a source of peridot, which was confused with topaz before the development of modern mineralogy.) Some scholars trace the origin back to Sanskrit (an ancient language of India) and the word topas or tapaz, meaning "fire." The ancient Greeks believed that topaz gave them strength. In Europe during the Renaissance (the period from the 1300s to the 1600s) people thought that topaz could break magic spells and dispel anger. For centuries, many people in India have believed that topaz worn above the heart assures long life, beauty, and intelligence. Today, topaz is one of the US birthstones for November. The other is citrine quartz.

Color

Topaz actually has an exceptionally wide color range that, besides brown, includes various tones and saturations of blue, green, yellow, orange, red, pink, and purple. Colorless topaz is plentiful, and is often treated to give it a blue color. Topaz is also pleochroic, meaning that the gem can show different colors in different crystal directions.

Topaz

Cleaning

It's important to avoid steam or ultrasound for cleaning topaz: Warm, soapy water works best.

This information was excerpted from GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about GIA, click here.

Shop our selection of topaz jewelry.

About Aquamarine
Aquamarine

Stone Information

Aquamarine crystals are known to be large in size and relatively clean and well-formed, making them particularly valuable to collectors of mineral specimens. Like many beryls, aquamarine forms large crystals suitable for sizable fashioned gems and carvings.

Legend & Lore

Aquamarine’s name comes from the Latin for seawater and it was said to calm waves and keep sailors safe at sea. March’s birthstone was also thought to enhance the happiness of marriages. The best gems combine high clarity with limpid transparency and blue to slightly greenish blue hues.

Color

Aquamarine is the green-blue to blue variety of the mineral beryl. (Emerald is the green to bluish green variety of the same mineral.) Its color is usually a light pastel greenish blue.

Aquamarine

Cleaning

Warm soapy water is always a safe cleaning method for aquamarine. Cleaning by ultrasonic and steam cleaners is usually safe unless the stone has liquid inclusions or fractures.

This information was excerpted from GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about GIA, click here.

Shop our selection of aquamarine jewelry.

About Amethyst
Amethyst

Stone Information & Mining

Amethyst is the purple variety of the quartz mineral species. It's the gem that's most commonly associated with the color purple, even though there are other purple gemstones such as sapphire and tanzanite. Its purple color can be cool and bluish, or a reddish purple that's sometimes referred to as "raspberry."

Legend & Lore

Because of its wine-like color, early Greek legends associated amethyst with Bacchus, the god of wine. Other legends reflected beliefs that amethyst kept its wearer clear-headed and quick-witted in battle and in business affairs. Fine amethysts have been set in religious jewelry and royal crown jewels for ages. It was once considered equal in value to ruby, emerald, and sapphire. It's no wonder that fine amethyst adorns the fingers of bishops as well as the coronation regalia of British royalty.

Color

Amethyst's purple color can range from a light lilac to a deep, intense royal purple and from brownish to vivid. Amethyst also commonly shows what is called color zoning, which in the case of amethyst usually consists of angular zones of darker to lighter color.

Amethyst

Cleaning

Amethyst can be safely cleaned with warm soapy water. Ultrasonic cleaners are usually safe except in the rare instances where a stone is dyed or treated by fracture filling. Steam cleaning is not recommended, and amethyst should not be subjected to heat.

This information was excerpted from GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about GIA, click here.

Shop our selection of amethyst jewelry.

Round Cut

The round is the most common type of brilliant cut and falls into the same category as the heart, oval, marquise, and pear. Over three-quarters of diamonds are round cut. All brilliants feature at least 58 facets and are known for their incredible fire and sparkle.

About Opal

Stone Information & Mining

Opal is known for its unique display of flashing rainbow colors called play-of-color. There are two broad classes of opal: precious and common. Precious opal displays play-of-color, common opal does not. Opal is the product of seasonal rains that drenched dry ground in regions such as Australia's semi-desert "outback." The showers soaked deep into ancient underground rock, carrying dissolved silica (a compound of silicon and oxygen) downward. During dry periods, much of the water evaporated, leaving solid deposits of silica in the cracks and between the layers of underground sedimentary rock. The silica deposits formed opal. Play-of-color occurs in precious opal because it's made up of sub-microscopic spheres stacked in a grid-like pattern—like layers of Ping-Pong balls in a box. As the lightwaves travel between the spheres, the waves diffract, or bend. As they bend, they break up into the colors of the rainbow, called spectral colors. Play-of-color is the result. When Australia's mines began to produce opals commercially in the 1890s, it quickly became the world's primary source for this October birthstone.

Legend & Lore

Because opal has the colors of other gemstones, the Romans thought it was the most precious and powerful of all. The Bedouins believed that opals contained lightning and fell from the sky during thunderstorms.

Color

Opal hues can range across the spectrum. An opal might display a single color, two or three colors, or all the colors of the rainbow. Opal displays background color in addition to play-of-color. Background color—also called body color—is caused by the suspension of tiny impurities within opal's silica spheres.

Cleaning

The only safe way to clean opal is with warm, soapy water.

This information was excerpted from the GIA's Gem Encyclopedia with permission from the GIA. For the full GIA Gem Encyclopedia entry, click here. For more information about the GIA, click here.

Shop our selection of opal jewelry.

About Gemstones

Explore our gemstone glossary filled with fun facts, intriguing lore & helpful cleaning tips.

Delivery Date Estimate

Share this Product

Reviews & Community QA

Rated 4 out of 5 by 25 reviewers.
Rated 4 out of 5 by Nice Set I bought the pearl and the emerald in this ring. The pearl was flawless and sits high enough on the finger that it will stack well with flat rings. The emerald was milky green and had an inclusion at the edge of the center stone, which is common for emeralds. Fit was true to size for me. 03-29-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by Beautiful Gemstone Ring! This ring exceeds my expectations! I ordered the white topaz to use as a substitute wedding ring and I am very pleased with my purchase. The stones are clear and beautifully faceted for lots of sparkle. For this price point this ring is a great deal. I have no trouble recommending it. 12-30-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by Pretty, but... This is a nice little ring if you want to stack it. It sits a little high for me to wear alone. I returned it because it was snagging on gloves & scarves. It may have just been a defective ring. The stone color in garnet was very pretty and saturated. I opted to return it for a similar ring with emerald cut garnets. It looks online like the replacement sits a bit lower. I would still recommend this ring. I think I just happened to get a bad one. 02-10-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by It's a Keeper The longer I have this ring, in the garnet, the more I like it. Mine fits well. The stones are clear, and the detail in the silver is so pretty. Would recommend. 01-21-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by AnniversaryRing Purchased this ring in citrine for my anniversary. Loved it so much, just ordered another one to stack them together. The detail work on the shank is quite attractive. Fit is perfect. 01-08-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by Pretty ring I got this ring in a 5. It fits perfectly. Stones are shiny and bright. I like the detail on the silver band. Very nice peridot. 08-13-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by Fabulus The ring was prettier than I expected!!!! I ordered the Nov birthstone and it was perfect. I am not a person who wears a lot of jewelry and was worried that it might be gawdy but to my surprise it was just what I wanted. 07-06-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by My wedding band I ordered the Swiss blue to go with my 3 stoned diamond white gold ring. My wedding is in Aug and my colors are shades of blue and silver. The color of the stones are gorgeous. I also love the detail on the shank it gives the ring an antique feel. I feel for the price I couldn't have gotten a better ring. I think this would be great alternative to a eternity band ring. I only gave it 4 stars since I haven't worn it regularly since I waiting to Aug I can't speak on how it holds up. I am hoping well. 06-30-14
  • 2016-05-29 T06:38:27.115-05:00
  • bvseo_lps, prod_bvrr, vn_prr_5.6
  • cp-1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_25, tr_25
  • loc_en_US, sid_J310334, prod, sort_default

Let's Stay in Touch

* *You're signing up to receive QVC promotional email.
Connect with Us

The scoop on everything Q, from helpful tips to interesting tidbits, questions, answers, and more.

QVC is not responsible for the availability, content, security, policies, or practices of the above referenced third-party linked sites, nor liable for statements, claims, opinions, or representations contained therein. QVC's Privacy Statement does not apply to these third-party web sites.

© 1995–2016 QVC, Inc. All rights reserved. Trademark Notice

Desktop View Mobile View